Essays on moral values in life

Nietzsche, on the other hand, wrote extensively and influentially about morality.  Scholars disagree about whether he should be classified as a relativist, but his thought certainly has a pronounced relativistic thrust.  His famous pronouncement that “God is dead” implies, among other things, that the idea of a transcendent or objective justification for moral claims—whether it be God, Platonic Forms, or Reason—is no longer credible.  And he explicitly embraces a form of perspectivism according to which “there are no moral phenomena, only moral interpretations of phenomena” ( Beyond Good and Evil , 108).   It is true that Nietzsche likes to rank moralities according to whether they are expressions of strength or weakness, health or sickness; but he does not insist that the criteria of rank he favors constitute an objectively privileged vantage point from which different moralities can be appraised.

Moral justifications for violence make so little sense as ruses that we have to assume they’re at least somewhat sincere. That’s an uncomfortable thought. If we accept that dangerous people might be motivated by genuine moral beliefs, we confront a troublingly subjective dimension to morality as such. At the very least, we must face the possibility that one can be sincerely wrong about it. And once you go that far, it’s a short leap to thinking maybe we’re the ones who are wrong, or that there’s nothing to be right about in the first place.

Many philosophers believe that morality consists of following precisely defined rules of conduct, such as "don't kill," or "don't steal." Presumably, I must learn these rules, and then make sure each of my actions live up to the rules. Virtue ethics , however, places less emphasis on learning rules, and instead stresses the importance of developing good habits of character , such as benevolence (see moral character ). Once I've acquired benevolence, for example, I will then habitually act in a benevolent manner. Historically, virtue theory is one of the oldest normative traditions in Western philosophy, having its roots in ancient Greek civilization. Plato emphasized four virtues in particular, which were later called cardinal virtues : wisdom, courage, temperance and justice. Other important virtues are fortitude, generosity, self-respect, good temper, and sincerity. In addition to advocating good habits of character, virtue theorists hold that we should avoid acquiring bad character traits, or vices , such as cowardice, insensibility, injustice, and vanity. Virtue theory emphasizes moral education since virtuous character traits are developed in one's youth. Adults, therefore, are responsible for instilling virtues in the young.

Ruth Kelso's The Doctrine of the English Gentleman in the 16th Century (Text) Table of Contents: CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION | CHAPTER II WHAT IS A GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER III THE THEORY OF THE FAVORED CLASS | CHAPTER IV OCCUPATIONS FOR THE GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER V THE MORAL CODE OF THE GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER VI THE EDUCATION OF THE GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER VII STUDIES | CHAPTER VIII EXCERCISE AND RECREATION CONCLUSION | FORWARD TO BIBLIOGRAPHICAL LIST | BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES  INDEX : actions+(1) | ambitious+(1) | Bassanio+(1) | beneficence+(1) | benefits+(2) | brags+(1) | busybody+(1) | caskets+(1) | Cicero+(2) | common+(1) | country+(2) | covetous+(1) | distrustful+(1) | Dulce_Utile+(1) | dying+(1) | Edmund+(2) | envious+(1) | faithful+(1) | fancy+(1) | Favour+(1) | favours+(2) | flatterer+(1) | fop+(1) | friend+(1) | giving+(1) | good_magistrate+(1) | Hal+(4) | happy_man+(1) | honest+(1) | honour+(1) | humble+(1) | hypocrite+(1) | Iago+(3) | integrity+(2) | justice+(1) | know_thyself+(1) | laws+(1) | Lear+(1) | liberality+(1) | Macbeth+(1) | malecontent+(1) | memory+ | Noble+(1) | Oswald+(2) | Othello+(1) | other_cheek+(4) | passions+(1) | patient+(1) | penitent+(1) | plain+(1) | PlainDealer+(2) | presumptuous+(1) | profane+(1) | reason+(2) | Reason_passion+(1) | regeneration+(1) | revenge+(1) | ring+(1) | Saussure_system+(1) | Shylock+(2) | slothful+(1) | stingy_mean+(1) | Stoic+(1) | Stoicism+(1) | Stoics+(2) | studies+(1) | superstitious+(1) | Theophrastus+(1) | trust+(1) | unconstant+(1) | unthrift+(1) | usury+(1) | vainglorious+(1) | valiant+(1) | Wyf+(3) View Ruth Kelso's The Doctrine of the English Gentleman in the 16th Century (Text)

Essays on moral values in life

essays on moral values in life

Ruth Kelso's The Doctrine of the English Gentleman in the 16th Century (Text) Table of Contents: CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION | CHAPTER II WHAT IS A GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER III THE THEORY OF THE FAVORED CLASS | CHAPTER IV OCCUPATIONS FOR THE GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER V THE MORAL CODE OF THE GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER VI THE EDUCATION OF THE GENTLEMAN | CHAPTER VII STUDIES | CHAPTER VIII EXCERCISE AND RECREATION CONCLUSION | FORWARD TO BIBLIOGRAPHICAL LIST | BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES  INDEX : actions+(1) | ambitious+(1) | Bassanio+(1) | beneficence+(1) | benefits+(2) | brags+(1) | busybody+(1) | caskets+(1) | Cicero+(2) | common+(1) | country+(2) | covetous+(1) | distrustful+(1) | Dulce_Utile+(1) | dying+(1) | Edmund+(2) | envious+(1) | faithful+(1) | fancy+(1) | Favour+(1) | favours+(2) | flatterer+(1) | fop+(1) | friend+(1) | giving+(1) | good_magistrate+(1) | Hal+(4) | happy_man+(1) | honest+(1) | honour+(1) | humble+(1) | hypocrite+(1) | Iago+(3) | integrity+(2) | justice+(1) | know_thyself+(1) | laws+(1) | Lear+(1) | liberality+(1) | Macbeth+(1) | malecontent+(1) | memory+ | Noble+(1) | Oswald+(2) | Othello+(1) | other_cheek+(4) | passions+(1) | patient+(1) | penitent+(1) | plain+(1) | PlainDealer+(2) | presumptuous+(1) | profane+(1) | reason+(2) | Reason_passion+(1) | regeneration+(1) | revenge+(1) | ring+(1) | Saussure_system+(1) | Shylock+(2) | slothful+(1) | stingy_mean+(1) | Stoic+(1) | Stoicism+(1) | Stoics+(2) | studies+(1) | superstitious+(1) | Theophrastus+(1) | trust+(1) | unconstant+(1) | unthrift+(1) | usury+(1) | vainglorious+(1) | valiant+(1) | Wyf+(3) View Ruth Kelso's The Doctrine of the English Gentleman in the 16th Century (Text)

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